Talent Identification : Searching For The Next Generation of Irish Rowers – Rosie Daniel

 

 

wk13 rosie 2

In today’s world of high performance sport Talent Identification Programmes (TID) has become an integral part of high performance sport with countries like Australia and Great Britain adopting such strategies and experiencing great success. It is thought that such programmes which identify sporting talent, allow early recruitment and help fast track athletes into sports where they can excel. Despite some arguing TID models are associated with low predictive values of future success at senior level one cannot overlook the fact that 5 out of the 10 gold medallists for the GB rowing squad at the London 2012 Games were from TID sources.  The much touted theory of Ericsson’s 10,000 hour rule of deliberate practise to become an expert performer has also been challenged by Malcolm Galdwell book ‘Outliers: The story of success’ and David Epstein  book ‘The Sports Gene’. Many examples of athletes reaching the top of their game in shorter time spans and with less deliberate practise have emerged down through the years. Donald Thomas (Bahamian High Jump World Champ 2007) and Heather Glover (GB Gold Medallist from London & Rio Games) taking up rowing 48 months before her first Olympic title.   Despite all the debate, one thing is for sure – practise, commitment and hard work all are prerequisites of elite performance. No matter how much training and practise an athlete does if they don’t have innate ability/talent or of a particular phenotype for that sport will they ever truly be world class?

With the recent success of the O’Donovan brothers at the Olympic Games in Rio and Shane O’Driscoll and Mark O’Donovan at this years’ Europeans the future of Irish Rowing looks bright! In May, Rowing Ireland in association with the PESS Department / UL BEO began our search for the next crop of elite Irish junior rowers. Mark Lyons, James Mangan (Rowing Ireland), ULBEO and Seamus Hickey (sports science student) have been involved in implementing the talent identification programme. To date approximately 50 (13-17yrs old) potential rowers were put through their paces in a series of physiological tests at two of our Talent ID days at the University of Limerick Boathouse.

In a sport like rowing, high performance coaches are well aware that anthropometrics can have a big impact on performance. Moving the boat favours the use of long levers (arms and legs) to obtain maximum forward propulsion. This is why so many of the most successful rowers in the world are tall (Sydney Olympics – open class male rowers were on average 1.93cm tall and 93.6kg in weight, corresponding values for females were 1.81cm and 76.6kg). According to Norton and Olds (1996) secular trends have shown that the average height of males and females is increasing by 1.2 and 1.3cm per decade so it is quite possible that rowers competing in Tokyo 2020 will be biggest we’ve seen to date. Height, leg and arm dimensions are of particular interest to Rowing Ireland in their TID programme combined with strength and endurance profiles that lend their hand to the six-seven minute event (2k row). Longer limbs (arms & legs) allow for greater biomechanical efficiency of the rowing stroke where stroke length is increased and the application of force over a greater distance enhances performance. Research has shown that Finalists from World Junior Rowing Championships were significantly taller and had greater length dimensions (arm

span, leg length) than non-finalists. However despite all these profiling measures there are always exceptions to the rules. World class athletes’ have emerged down through the years who don’t conform to the physical attributes of athletes associated with a particular sport – these are the real interesting cases!

How does the Talent ID programme work?

The main aim of our Talent ID programme is to identify youths with raw talent, anthropometric profiles, cardiovascular fitness combined with muscle strength and endurance conducive to high performance rowing. Once potential youths have been identified, if they are not already part of a club they will be introduced to their nearest rowing club and put on a monitoring programme where sports science support (strength and conditioning, technical coaching and nutrition) will be provided to help develop and support their talent. Youth who progress well on that system may have the potential to make the high performance national team.

What Testing is conducted on Talent ID Days?

Range of motion and functional movement tests – Ankle, leg, hip, back and shoulder mobility, FMS Screen

Anthropometrics – Height, Weight, Armspan

Rowing Proficiency/Kinematics using the Bio Row Catch Training System

Rowing Assessment – 500m ‘all out’ row on an ergometer

 

 

 

 

 

 

What type of youths are we looking for?

  1. Youths aged 13-17yrs
  2. Youths with good aerobic fitness and strength
  3. Tall youths with long levers (arms & legs)
  4. Committed, motivated individuals with a good work ethic

If you know of someone who may have the potential to be a successful rower please contact james.mangan@rowingireland.ie for more information about upcoming Talent ID days. Please note that rowing experience is not essential – youths from all sporting backgrounds are welcome.

 

In today’s world of high performance sport Talent Identification Programmes (TID) has become an integral part of high performance sport with countries like Australia and Great Britain adopting such strategies and experiencing great success. It is thought that such programmes which identify sporting talent, allow early recruitment and help fast track athletes into sports where they can excel. Despite some arguing TID models are associated with low predictive values of future success at senior level one cannot overlook the fact that 5 out of the 10 gold medallists for the GB rowing squad at the London 2012 Games were from TID sources.  The much touted theory of Ericsson’s 10,000 hour rule of deliberate practise to become an expert performer has also been challenged by Malcolm Galdwell book ‘Outliers: The story of success’ and David Epstein  book ‘The Sports Gene’. Many examples of athletes reaching the top of their game in shorter time spans and with less deliberate practise have emerged down through the years. Donald Thomas (Bahamian High Jump World Champ 2007) and Heather Glover (GB Gold Medallist from London & Rio Games) taking up rowing 48 months before her first Olympic title.   Despite all the debate, one thing is for sure – practise, commitment and hard work all are prerequisites of elite performance. No matter how much training and practise an athlete does if they don’t have innate ability/talent or of a particular phenotype for that sport will they ever truly be world class?

wk13 rosie 3

With the recent success of the O’Donovan brothers at the Olympic Games in Rio and Shane O’Driscoll and Mark O’Donovan at this years’ Europeans the future of Irish Rowing looks bright! In May, Rowing Ireland in association with the PESS Department / UL BEO began our search for the next crop of elite Irish junior rowers. Mark Lyons, James Mangan (Rowing Ireland), ULBEO and Seamus Hickey (sports science student) have been involved in implementing the talent identification programme. To date approximately 50 (13-17yrs old) potential rowers were put through their paces in a series of physiological tests at two of our Talent ID days at the University of Limerick Boathouse.

In a sport like rowing, high performance coaches are well aware that anthropometrics can have a big impact on performance. Moving the boat favours the use of long levers (arms and legs) to obtain maximum forward propulsion. This is why so many of the most successful rowers in the world are tall (Sydney Olympics – open class male rowers were on average 1.93cm tall and 93.6kg in weight, corresponding values for females were 1.81cm and 76.6kg). According to Norton and Olds (1996) secular trends have shown that the average height of males and females is increasing by 1.2 and 1.3cm per decade so it is quite possible that rowers competing in Tokyo 2020 will be biggest we’ve seen to date. Height, leg and arm dimensions are of particular interest to Rowing Ireland in their TID programme combined with strength and endurance profiles that lend their hand to the six-seven minute event (2k row). Longer limbs (arms & legs) allow for greater biomechanical efficiency of the rowing stroke where stroke length is increased and the application of force over a greater distance enhances performance. Research has shown that Finalists from World Junior Rowing Championships were significantly taller and had greater length dimensions (arm

span, leg length) than non-finalists. However despite all these profiling measures there are always exceptions to the rules. World class athletes’ have emerged down through the years who don’t conform to the physical attributes of athletes associated with a particular sport – these are the real interesting cases!

How does the Talent ID programme work?

The main aim of our Talent ID programme is to identify youths with raw talent, anthropometric profiles, cardiovascular fitness combined with muscle strength and endurance conducive to high performance rowing. Once potential youths have been identified, if they are not already part of a club they will be introduced to their nearest rowing club and put on a monitoring programme where sports science support (strength and conditioning, technical coaching and nutrition) will be provided to help develop and support their talent. Youth who progress well on that system may have the potential to make the high performance national team.

What Testing is conducted on Talent ID Days?

Range of motion and functional movement tests – Ankle, leg, hip, back and shoulder mobility, FMS Screen

Anthropometrics – Height, Weight, Armspan

Rowing Proficiency/Kinematics using the Bio Row Catch Training System

Rowing Assessment – 500m ‘all out’ row on an ergometer

wk13 rosie 4wk13 rosie 5

 

What type of youths are we looking for?

  1. Youths aged 13-17yrs
  2. Youths with good aerobic fitness and strength
  3. Tall youths with long levers (arms & legs)
  4. Committed, motivated individuals with a good work ethic

If you know of someone who may have the potential to be a successful rower please contact james.mangan@rowingireland.ie for more information about upcoming Talent ID days. Please note that rowing experience is not essential – youths from all sporting backgrounds are welcome.

In today’s world of high performance sport Talent Identification Programmes (TID) has become an integral part of high performance sport with countries like Australia and Great Britain adopting such strategies and experiencing great success. It is thought that such programmes which identify sporting talent, allow early recruitment and help fast track athletes into sports where they can excel. Despite some arguing TID models are associated with low predictive values of future success at senior level one cannot overlook the fact that 5 out of the 10 gold medallists for the GB rowing squad at the London 2012 Games were from TID sources.  The much touted theory of Ericsson’s 10,000 hour rule of deliberate practise to become an expert performer has also been challenged by Malcolm Galdwell book ‘Outliers: The story of success’ and David Epstein  book ‘The Sports Gene’. Many examples of athletes reaching the top of their game in shorter time spans and with less deliberate practise have emerged down through the years. Donald Thomas (Bahamian High Jump World Champ 2007) and Heather Glover (GB Gold Medallist from London & Rio Games) taking up rowing 48 months before her first Olympic title.   Despite all the debate, one thing is for sure – practise, commitment and hard work all are prerequisites of elite performance. No matter how much training and practise an athlete does if they don’t have innate ability/talent or of a particular phenotype for that sport will they ever truly be world class?

wk13 rosie 3

With the recent success of the O’Donovan brothers at the Olympic Games in Rio and Shane O’Driscoll and Mark O’Donovan at this years’ Europeans the future of Irish Rowing looks bright! In May, Rowing Ireland in association with the PESS Department / UL BEO began our search for the next crop of elite Irish junior rowers. Mark Lyons, James Mangan (Rowing Ireland), ULBEO and Seamus Hickey (sports science student) have been involved in implementing the talent identification programme. To date approximately 50 (13-17yrs old) potential rowers were put through their paces in a series of physiological tests at two of our Talent ID days at the University of Limerick Boathouse.

In a sport like rowing, high performance coaches are well aware that anthropometrics can have a big impact on performance. Moving the boat favours the use of long levers (arms and legs) to obtain maximum forward propulsion. This is why so many of the most successful rowers in the world are tall (Sydney Olympics – open class male rowers were on average 1.93cm tall and 93.6kg in weight, corresponding values for females were 1.81cm and 76.6kg). According to Norton and Olds (1996) secular trends have shown that the average height of males and females is increasing by 1.2 and 1.3cm per decade so it is quite possible that rowers competing in Tokyo 2020 will be biggest we’ve seen to date. Height, leg and arm dimensions are of particular interest to Rowing Ireland in their TID programme combined with strength and endurance profiles that lend their hand to the six-seven minute event (2k row). Longer limbs (arms & legs) allow for greater biomechanical efficiency of the rowing stroke where stroke length is increased and the application of force over a greater distance enhances performance. Research has shown that Finalists from World Junior Rowing Championships were significantly taller and had greater length dimensions (arm

span, leg length) than non-finalists. However despite all these profiling measures there are always exceptions to the rules. World class athletes’ have emerged down through the years who don’t conform to the physical attributes of athletes associated with a particular sport – these are the real interesting cases!

How does the Talent ID programme work?

The main aim of our Talent ID programme is to identify youths with raw talent, anthropometric profiles, cardiovascular fitness combined with muscle strength and endurance conducive to high performance rowing. Once potential youths have been identified, if they are not already part of a club they will be introduced to their nearest rowing club and put on a monitoring programme where sports science support (strength and conditioning, technical coaching and nutrition) will be provided to help develop and support their talent. Youth who progress well on that system may have the potential to make the high performance national team.

What Testing is conducted on Talent ID Days?

Range of motion and functional movement tests – Ankle, leg, hip, back and shoulder mobility, FMS Screen

Anthropometrics – Height, Weight, Armspan

Rowing Proficiency/Kinematics using the Bio Row Catch Training System

Rowing Assessment – 500m ‘all out’ row on an ergometer

wk13 rosie 4wk13 rosie 5

 

 

 

 

 

 

What type of youths are we looking for?

  1. Youths aged 13-17yrs
  2. Youths with good aerobic fitness and strength
  3. Tall youths with long levers (arms & legs)
  4. Committed, motivated individuals with a good work ethic

If you know of someone who may have the potential to be a successful rower please contact james.mangan@rowingireland.ie for more information about upcoming Talent ID days. Please note that rowing experience is not essential – youths from all sporting backgrounds are welcome.

In today’s world of high performance sport Talent Identification Programmes (TID) has become an integral part of high performance sport with countries like Australia and Great Britain adopting such strategies and experiencing great success. It is thought that such programmes which identify sporting talent, allow early recruitment and help fast track athletes into sports where they can excel. Despite some arguing TID models are associated with low predictive values of future success at senior level one cannot overlook the fact that 5 out of the 10 gold medallists for the GB rowing squad at the London 2012 Games were from TID sources.  The much touted theory of Ericsson’s 10,000 hour rule of deliberate practise to become an expert performer has also been challenged by Malcolm Galdwell book ‘Outliers: The story of success’ and David Epstein  book ‘The Sports Gene’. Many examples of athletes reaching the top of their game in shorter time spans and with less deliberate practise have emerged down through the years. Donald Thomas (Bahamian High Jump World Champ 2007) and Heather Glover (GB Gold Medallist from London & Rio Games) taking up rowing 48 months before her first Olympic title.   Despite all the debate, one thing is for sure – practise, commitment and hard work all are prerequisites of elite performance. No matter how much training and practise an athlete does if they don’t have innate ability/talent or of a particular phenotype for that sport will they ever truly be world class?

wk13 rosie 3

With the recent success of the O’Donovan brothers at the Olympic Games in Rio and Shane O’Driscoll and Mark O’Donovan at this years’ Europeans the future of Irish Rowing looks bright! In May, Rowing Ireland in association with the PESS Department / UL BEO began our search for the next crop of elite Irish junior rowers. Mark Lyons, James Mangan (Rowing Ireland), ULBEO and Seamus Hickey (sports science student) have been involved in implementing the talent identification programme. To date approximately 50 (13-17yrs old) potential rowers were put through their paces in a series of physiological tests at two of our Talent ID days at the University of Limerick Boathouse.

In a sport like rowing, high performance coaches are well aware that anthropometrics can have a big impact on performance. Moving the boat favours the use of long levers (arms and legs) to obtain maximum forward propulsion. This is why so many of the most successful rowers in the world are tall (Sydney Olympics – open class male rowers were on average 1.93cm tall and 93.6kg in weight, corresponding values for females were 1.81cm and 76.6kg). According to Norton and Olds (1996) secular trends have shown that the average height of males and females is increasing by 1.2 and 1.3cm per decade so it is quite possible that rowers competing in Tokyo 2020 will be biggest we’ve seen to date. Height, leg and arm dimensions are of particular interest to Rowing Ireland in their TID programme combined with strength and endurance profiles that lend their hand to the six-seven minute event (2k row). Longer limbs (arms & legs) allow for greater biomechanical efficiency of the rowing stroke where stroke length is increased and the application of force over a greater distance enhances performance. Research has shown that Finalists from World Junior Rowing Championships were significantly taller and had greater length dimensions (arm

span, leg length) than non-finalists. However despite all these profiling measures there are always exceptions to the rules. World class athletes’ have emerged down through the years who don’t conform to the physical attributes of athletes associated with a particular sport – these are the real interesting cases!

How does the Talent ID programme work?

The main aim of our Talent ID programme is to identify youths with raw talent, anthropometric profiles, cardiovascular fitness combined with muscle strength and endurance conducive to high performance rowing. Once potential youths have been identified, if they are not already part of a club they will be introduced to their nearest rowing club and put on a monitoring programme where sports science support (strength and conditioning, technical coaching and nutrition) will be provided to help develop and support their talent. Youth who progress well on that system may have the potential to make the high performance national team.

What Testing is conducted on Talent ID Days?

Range of motion and functional movement tests – Ankle, leg, hip, back and shoulder mobility, FMS Screen

Anthropometrics – Height, Weight, Armspan

Rowing Proficiency/Kinematics using the Bio Row Catch Training System

Rowing Assessment – 500m ‘all out’ row on an ergometer

wk13 rosie 4wk13 rosie 5

 

 

 

 

 

 

What type of youths are we looking for?

  1. Youths aged 13-17yrs
  2. Youths with good aerobic fitness and strength
  3. Tall youths with long levers (arms & legs)
  4. Committed, motivated individuals with a good work ethic

If you know of someone who may have the potential to be a successful rower please contact james.mangan@rowingireland.ie for more information about upcoming Talent ID days. Please note that rowing experience is not essential – youths from all sporting backgrounds are welcome.

In today’s world of high performance sport Talent Identification Programmes (TID) has become an integral part of high performance sport with countries like Australia and Great Britain adopting such strategies and experiencing great success. It is thought that such programmes which identify sporting talent, allow early recruitment and help fast track athletes into sports where they can excel. Despite some arguing TID models are associated with low predictive values of future success at senior level one cannot overlook the fact that 5 out of the 10 gold medallists for the GB rowing squad at the London 2012 Games were from TID sources.  The much touted theory of Ericsson’s 10,000 hour rule of deliberate practise to become an expert performer has also been challenged by Malcolm Galdwell book ‘Outliers: The story of success’ and David Epstein  book ‘The Sports Gene’. Many examples of athletes reaching the top of their game in shorter time spans and with less deliberate practise have emerged down through the years. Donald Thomas (Bahamian High Jump World Champ 2007) and Heather Glover (GB Gold Medallist from London & Rio Games) taking up rowing 48 months before her first Olympic title.   Despite all the debate, one thing is for sure – practise, commitment and hard work all are prerequisites of elite performance. No matter how much training and practise an athlete does if they don’t have innate ability/talent or of a particular phenotype for that sport will they ever truly be world class?

With the recent success of the O’Donovan brothers at the Olympic Games in Rio and Shane O’Driscoll and Mark O’Donovan at this years’ Europeans the future of Irish Rowing looks bright! In May, Rowing Ireland in association with the PESS Department / UL BEO began our search for the next crop of elite Irish junior rowers. Mark Lyons, James Mangan (Rowing Ireland), ULBEO and Seamus Hickey (sports science student) have been involved in implementing the talent identification programme. To date approximately 50 (13-17yrs old) potential rowers were put through their paces in a series of physiological tests at two of our Talent ID days at the University of Limerick Boathouse.

In a sport like rowing, high performance coaches are well aware that anthropometrics can have a big impact on performance. Moving the boat favours the use of long levers (arms and legs) to obtain maximum forward propulsion. This is why so many of the most successful rowers in the world are tall (Sydney Olympics – open class male rowers were on average 1.93cm tall and 93.6kg in weight, corresponding values for females were 1.81cm and 76.6kg). According to Norton and Olds (1996) secular trends have shown that the average height of males and females is increasing by 1.2 and 1.3cm per decade so it is quite possible that rowers competing in Tokyo 2020 will be biggest we’ve seen to date. Height, leg and arm dimensions are of particular interest to Rowing Ireland in their TID programme combined with strength and endurance profiles that lend their hand to the six-seven minute event (2k row). Longer limbs (arms & legs) allow for greater biomechanical efficiency of the rowing stroke where stroke length is increased and the application of force over a greater distance enhances performance. Research has shown that Finalists from World Junior Rowing Championships were significantly taller and had greater length dimensions (arm

span, leg length) than non-finalists. However despite all these profiling measures there are always exceptions to the rules. World class athletes’ have emerged down through the years who don’t conform to the physical attributes of athletes associated with a particular sport – these are the real interesting cases!

How does the Talent ID programme work?

The main aim of our Talent ID programme is to identify youths with raw talent, anthropometric profiles, cardiovascular fitness combined with muscle strength and endurance conducive to high performance rowing. Once potential youths have been identified, if they are not already part of a club they will be introduced to their nearest rowing club and put on a monitoring programme where sports science support (strength and conditioning, technical coaching and nutrition) will be provided to help develop and support their talent. Youth who progress well on that system may have the potential to make the high performance national team.

What Testing is conducted on Talent ID Days?

Range of motion and functional movement tests – Ankle, leg, hip, back and shoulder mobility, FMS Screen

Anthropometrics – Height, Weight, Armspan

Rowing Proficiency/Kinematics using the Bio Row Catch Training System

Rowing Assessment – 500m ‘all out’ row on an ergometer

 

 

 

 

 

 

What type of youths are we looking for?

  1. Youths aged 13-17yrs
  2. Youths with good aerobic fitness and strength
  3. Tall youths with long levers (arms & legs)
  4. Committed, motivated individuals with a good work ethic

If you know of someone who may have the potential to be a successful rower please contact james.mangan@rowingireland.ie for more information about upcoming Talent ID days. Please note that rowing experience is not essential – youths from all sporting backgrounds are welcome.

In today’s world of high performance sport Talent Identification Programmes (TID) has become an integral part of high performance sport with countries like Australia and Great Britain adopting such strategies and experiencing great success. It is thought that such programmes which identify sporting talent, allow early recruitment and help fast track athletes into sports where they can excel. Despite some arguing TID models are associated with low predictive values of future success at senior level one cannot overlook the fact that 5 out of the 10 gold medallists for the GB rowing squad at the London 2012 Games were from TID sources.  The much touted theory of Ericsson’s 10,000 hour rule of deliberate practise to become an expert performer has also been challenged by Malcolm Galdwell book ‘Outliers: The story of success’ and David Epstein  book ‘The Sports Gene’. Many examples of athletes reaching the top of their game in shorter time spans and with less deliberate practise have emerged down through the years. Donald Thomas (Bahamian High Jump World Champ 2007) and Heather Glover (GB Gold Medallist from London & Rio Games) taking up rowing 48 months before her first Olympic title.   Despite all the debate, one thing is for sure – practise, commitment and hard work all are prerequisites of elite performance. No matter how much training and practise an athlete does if they don’t have innate ability/talent or of a particular phenotype for that sport will they ever truly be world class?

With the recent success of the O’Donovan brothers at the Olympic Games in Rio and Shane O’Driscoll and Mark O’Donovan at this years’ Europeans the future of Irish Rowing looks bright! In May, Rowing Ireland in association with the PESS Department / UL BEO began our search for the next crop of elite Irish junior rowers. Mark Lyons, James Mangan (Rowing Ireland), ULBEO and Seamus Hickey (sports science student) have been involved in implementing the talent identification programme. To date approximately 50 (13-17yrs old) potential rowers were put through their paces in a series of physiological tests at two of our Talent ID days at the University of Limerick Boathouse.

In a sport like rowing, high performance coaches are well aware that anthropometrics can have a big impact on performance. Moving the boat favours the use of long levers (arms and legs) to obtain maximum forward propulsion. This is why so many of the most successful rowers in the world are tall (Sydney Olympics – open class male rowers were on average 1.93cm tall and 93.6kg in weight, corresponding values for females were 1.81cm and 76.6kg). According to Norton and Olds (1996) secular trends have shown that the average height of males and females is increasing by 1.2 and 1.3cm per decade so it is quite possible that rowers competing in Tokyo 2020 will be biggest we’ve seen to date. Height, leg and arm dimensions are of particular interest to Rowing Ireland in their TID programme combined with strength and endurance profiles that lend their hand to the six-seven minute event (2k row). Longer limbs (arms & legs) allow for greater biomechanical efficiency of the rowing stroke where stroke length is increased and the application of force over a greater distance enhances performance. Research has shown that Finalists from World Junior Rowing Championships were significantly taller and had greater length dimensions (arm

span, leg length) than non-finalists. However despite all these profiling measures there are always exceptions to the rules. World class athletes’ have emerged down through the years who don’t conform to the physical attributes of athletes associated with a particular sport – these are the real interesting cases!

How does the Talent ID programme work?

The main aim of our Talent ID programme is to identify youths with raw talent, anthropometric profiles, cardiovascular fitness combined with muscle strength and endurance conducive to high performance rowing. Once potential youths have been identified, if they are not already part of a club they will be introduced to their nearest rowing club and put on a monitoring programme where sports science support (strength and conditioning, technical coaching and nutrition) will be provided to help develop and support their talent. Youth who progress well on that system may have the potential to make the high performance national team.

What Testing is conducted on Talent ID Days?

Range of motion and functional movement tests – Ankle, leg, hip, back and shoulder mobility, FMS Screen

Anthropometrics – Height, Weight, Armspan

Rowing Proficiency/Kinematics using the Bio Row Catch Training System

Rowing Assessment – 500m ‘all out’ row on an ergometer

 

 

 

 

 

 

What type of youths are we looking for?

  1. Youths aged 13-17yrs
  2. Youths with good aerobic fitness and strength
  3. Tall youths with long levers (arms & legs)
  4. Committed, motivated individuals with a good work ethic

If you know of someone who may have the potential to be a successful rower please contact james.mangan@rowingireland.ie for more information about upcoming Talent ID days. Please note that rowing experience is not essential – youths from all sporting backgrounds are welcome.

In today’s world of high performance sport Talent Identification Programmes (TID) has become an integral part of high performance sport with countries like Australia and Great Britain adopting such strategies and experiencing great success. It is thought that such programmes which identify sporting talent, allow early recruitment and help fast track athletes into sports where they can excel. Despite some arguing TID models are associated with low predictive values of future success at senior level one cannot overlook the fact that 5 out of the 10 gold medallists for the GB rowing squad at the London 2012 Games were from TID sources.  The much touted theory of Ericsson’s 10,000 hour rule of deliberate practise to become an expert performer has also been challenged by Malcolm Galdwell book ‘Outliers: The story of success’ and David Epstein  book ‘The Sports Gene’. Many examples of athletes reaching the top of their game in shorter time spans and with less deliberate practise have emerged down through the years. Donald Thomas (Bahamian High Jump World Champ 2007) and Heather Glover (GB Gold Medallist from London & Rio Games) taking up rowing 48 months before her first Olympic title.   Despite all the debate, one thing is for sure – practise, commitment and hard work all are prerequisites of elite performance. No matter how much training and practise an athlete does if they don’t have innate ability/talent or of a particular phenotype for that sport will they ever truly be world class?

With the recent success of the O’Donovan brothers at the Olympic Games in Rio and Shane O’Driscoll and Mark O’Donovan at this years’ Europeans the future of Irish Rowing looks bright! In May, Rowing Ireland in association with the PESS Department / UL BEO began our search for the next crop of elite Irish junior rowers. Mark Lyons, James Mangan (Rowing Ireland), ULBEO and Seamus Hickey (sports science student) have been involved in implementing the talent identification programme. To date approximately 50 (13-17yrs old) potential rowers were put through their paces in a series of physiological tests at two of our Talent ID days at the University of Limerick Boathouse.

In a sport like rowing, high performance coaches are well aware that anthropometrics can have a big impact on performance. Moving the boat favours the use of long levers (arms and legs) to obtain maximum forward propulsion. This is why so many of the most successful rowers in the world are tall (Sydney Olympics – open class male rowers were on average 1.93cm tall and 93.6kg in weight, corresponding values for females were 1.81cm and 76.6kg). According to Norton and Olds (1996) secular trends have shown that the average height of males and females is increasing by 1.2 and 1.3cm per decade so it is quite possible that rowers competing in Tokyo 2020 will be biggest we’ve seen to date. Height, leg and arm dimensions are of particular interest to Rowing Ireland in their TID programme combined with strength and endurance profiles that lend their hand to the six-seven minute event (2k row). Longer limbs (arms & legs) allow for greater biomechanical efficiency of the rowing stroke where stroke length is increased and the application of force over a greater distance enhances performance. Research has shown that Finalists from World Junior Rowing Championships were significantly taller and had greater length dimensions (arm

span, leg length) than non-finalists. However despite all these profiling measures there are always exceptions to the rules. World class athletes’ have emerged down through the years who don’t conform to the physical attributes of athletes associated with a particular sport – these are the real interesting cases!

How does the Talent ID programme work?

The main aim of our Talent ID programme is to identify youths with raw talent, anthropometric profiles, cardiovascular fitness combined with muscle strength and endurance conducive to high performance rowing. Once potential youths have been identified, if they are not already part of a club they will be introduced to their nearest rowing club and put on a monitoring programme where sports science support (strength and conditioning, technical coaching and nutrition) will be provided to help develop and support their talent. Youth who progress well on that system may have the potential to make the high performance national team.

What Testing is conducted on Talent ID Days?

Range of motion and functional movement tests – Ankle, leg, hip, back and shoulder mobility, FMS Screen

Anthropometrics – Height, Weight, Armspan

Rowing Proficiency/Kinematics using the Bio Row Catch Training System

Rowing Assessment – 500m ‘all out’ row on an ergometer

 

 

 

 

 

 

What type of youths are we looking for?

  1. Youths aged 13-17yrs
  2. Youths with good aerobic fitness and strength
  3. Tall youths with long levers (arms & legs)
  4. Committed, motivated individuals with a good work ethic

If you know of someone who may have the potential to be a successful rower please contact james.mangan@rowingireland.ie for more information about upcoming Talent ID days. Please note that rowing experience is not essential – youths from all sporting backgrounds are welcome.

In today’s world of high performance sport Talent Identification Programmes (TID) has become an integral part of high performance sport with countries like Australia and Great Britain adopting such strategies and experiencing great success. It is thought that such programmes which identify sporting talent, allow early recruitment and help fast track athletes into sports where they can excel. Despite some arguing TID models are associated with low predictive values of future success at senior level one cannot overlook the fact that 5 out of the 10 gold medallists for the GB rowing squad at the London 2012 Games were from TID sources.  The much touted theory of Ericsson’s 10,000 hour rule of deliberate practise to become an expert performer has also been challenged by Malcolm Galdwell book ‘Outliers: The story of success’ and David Epstein  book ‘The Sports Gene’. Many examples of athletes reaching the top of their game in shorter time spans and with less deliberate practise have emerged down through the years. Donald Thomas (Bahamian High Jump World Champ 2007) and Heather Glover (GB Gold Medallist from London & Rio Games) taking up rowing 48 months before her first Olympic title.   Despite all the debate, one thing is for sure – practise, commitment and hard work all are prerequisites of elite performance. No matter how much training and practise an athlete does if they don’t have innate ability/talent or of a particular phenotype for that sport will they ever truly be world class?

With the recent success of the O’Donovan brothers at the Olympic Games in Rio and Shane O’Driscoll and Mark O’Donovan at this years’ Europeans the future of Irish Rowing looks bright! In May, Rowing Ireland in association with the PESS Department / UL BEO began our search for the next crop of elite Irish junior rowers. Mark Lyons, James Mangan (Rowing Ireland), ULBEO and Seamus Hickey (sports science student) have been involved in implementing the talent identification programme. To date approximately 50 (13-17yrs old) potential rowers were put through their paces in a series of physiological tests at two of our Talent ID days at the University of Limerick Boathouse.

In a sport like rowing, high performance coaches are well aware that anthropometrics can have a big impact on performance. Moving the boat favours the use of long levers (arms and legs) to obtain maximum forward propulsion. This is why so many of the most successful rowers in the world are tall (Sydney Olympics – open class male rowers were on average 1.93cm tall and 93.6kg in weight, corresponding values for females were 1.81cm and 76.6kg). According to Norton and Olds (1996) secular trends have shown that the average height of males and females is increasing by 1.2 and 1.3cm per decade so it is quite possible that rowers competing in Tokyo 2020 will be biggest we’ve seen to date. Height, leg and arm dimensions are of particular interest to Rowing Ireland in their TID programme combined with strength and endurance profiles that lend their hand to the six-seven minute event (2k row). Longer limbs (arms & legs) allow for greater biomechanical efficiency of the rowing stroke where stroke length is increased and the application of force over a greater distance enhances performance. Research has shown that Finalists from World Junior Rowing Championships were significantly taller and had greater length dimensions (arm

span, leg length) than non-finalists. However despite all these profiling measures there are always exceptions to the rules. World class athletes’ have emerged down through the years who don’t conform to the physical attributes of athletes associated with a particular sport – these are the real interesting cases!

How does the Talent ID programme work?

The main aim of our Talent ID programme is to identify youths with raw talent, anthropometric profiles, cardiovascular fitness combined with muscle strength and endurance conducive to high performance rowing. Once potential youths have been identified, if they are not already part of a club they will be introduced to their nearest rowing club and put on a monitoring programme where sports science support (strength and conditioning, technical coaching and nutrition) will be provided to help develop and support their talent. Youth who progress well on that system may have the potential to make the high performance national team.

What Testing is conducted on Talent ID Days?

Range of motion and functional movement tests – Ankle, leg, hip, back and shoulder mobility, FMS Screen

Anthropometrics – Height, Weight, Armspan

Rowing Proficiency/Kinematics using the Bio Row Catch Training System

Rowing Assessment – 500m ‘all out’ row on an ergometer

 

 

 

 

 

 

What type of youths are we looking for?

  1. Youths aged 13-17yrs
  2. Youths with good aerobic fitness and strength
  3. Tall youths with long levers (arms & legs)
  4. Committed, motivated individuals with a good work ethic

If you know of someone who may have the potential to be a successful rower please contact james.mangan@rowingireland.ie for more information about upcoming Talent ID days. Please note that rowing experience is not essential – youths from all sporting backgrounds are welcome.

In today’s world of high performance sport Talent Identification Programmes (TID) has become an integral part of high performance sport with countries like Australia and Great Britain adopting such strategies and experiencing great success. It is thought that such programmes which identify sporting talent, allow early recruitment and help fast track athletes into sports where they can excel. Despite some arguing TID models are associated with low predictive values of future success at senior level one cannot overlook the fact that 5 out of the 10 gold medallists for the GB rowing squad at the London 2012 Games were from TID sources.  The much touted theory of Ericsson’s 10,000 hour rule of deliberate practise to become an expert performer has also been challenged by Malcolm Galdwell book ‘Outliers: The story of success’ and David Epstein  book ‘The Sports Gene’. Many examples of athletes reaching the top of their game in shorter time spans and with less deliberate practise have emerged down through the years. Donald Thomas (Bahamian High Jump World Champ 2007) and Heather Glover (GB Gold Medallist from London & Rio Games) taking up rowing 48 months before her first Olympic title.   Despite all the debate, one thing is for sure – practise, commitment and hard work all are prerequisites of elite performance. No matter how much training and practise an athlete does if they don’t have innate ability/talent or of a particular phenotype for that sport will they ever truly be world class?

 

With the recent success of the O’Donovan brothers at the Olympic Games in Rio and Shane O’Driscoll and Mark O’Donovan at this years’ Europeans the future of Irish Rowing looks bright! In May, Rowing Ireland in association with the PESS Department / UL BEO began our search for the next crop of elite Irish junior rowers. Mark Lyons, James Mangan (Rowing Ireland), ULBEO and Seamus Hickey (sports science student) have been involved in implementing the talent identification programme. To date approximately 50 (13-17yrs old) potential rowers were put through their paces in a series of physiological tests at two of our Talent ID days at the University of Limerick Boathouse.

 

In a sport like rowing, high performance coaches are well aware that anthropometrics can have a big impact on performance. Moving the boat favours the use of long levers (arms and legs) to obtain maximum forward propulsion. This is why so many of the most successful rowers in the world are tall (Sydney Olympics – open class male rowers were on average 1.93cm tall and 93.6kg in weight, corresponding values for females were 1.81cm and 76.6kg). According to Norton and Olds (1996) secular trends have shown that the average height of males and females is increasing by 1.2 and 1.3cm per decade so it is quite possible that rowers competing in Tokyo 2020 will be biggest we’ve seen to date. Height, leg and arm dimensions are of particular interest to Rowing Ireland in their TID programme combined with strength and endurance profiles that lend their hand to the six-seven minute event (2k row). Longer limbs (arms & legs) allow for greater biomechanical efficiency of the rowing stroke where stroke length is increased and the application of force over a greater distance enhances performance. Research has shown that Finalists from World Junior Rowing Championships were significantly taller and had greater length dimensions (arm span, leg length) than non-finalists. However despite all these profiling measures there are always exceptions to the rules. World class athletes’ have emerged down through the years who don’t conform to the physical attributes of athletes associated with a particular sport – these are the real interesting cases!

 

 

How does the Talent ID programme work?

The main aim of our Talent ID programme is to identify youths with raw talent, anthropometric profiles, cardiovascular fitness combined with muscle strength and endurance conducive to high performance rowing. Once potential youths have been identified, if they are not already part of a club they will be introduced to their nearest rowing club and put on a monitoring programme where sports science support (strength and conditioning, technical coaching and nutrition) will be provided to help develop and support their talent. Youth who progress well on that system may have the potential to make the high performance national team.

 

What Testing is conducted on Talent ID Days?

Range of motion and functional movement tests – Ankle, leg, hip, back and shoulder mobility, FMS Screen

Anthropometrics – Height, Weight, Armspan

Rowing Proficiency/Kinematics using the Bio Row Catch Training System

Rowing Assessment – 500m ‘all out’ row on an ergometer

 

 

What type of youths are we looking for?

1.       Youths aged 13-17yrs

2.       Youths with good aerobic fitness and strength

3.       Tall youths with long levers (arms & legs)

4.       Committed, motivated individuals with a good work ethic

 

If you know of someone who may have the potential to be a successful rower please contact james.mangan@rowingireland.ie for more information about upcoming Talent ID days. Please note that rowing experience is not essential – youths from all sporting backgrounds are welcome.

In today’s world of high performance sport Talent Identification Programmes (TID) has become an integral part of high performance sport with countries like Australia and Great Britain adopting such strategies and experiencing great success. It is thought that such programmes which identify sporting talent, allow early recruitment and help fast track athletes into sports where they can excel. Despite some arguing TID models are associated with low predictive values of future success at senior level one cannot overlook the fact that 5 out of the 10 gold medallists for the GB rowing squad at the London 2012 Games were from TID sources.  The much touted theory of Ericsson’s 10,000 hour rule of deliberate practise to become an expert performer has also been challenged by Malcolm Galdwell book ‘Outliers: The story of success’ and David Epstein  book ‘The Sports Gene’. Many examples of athletes reaching the top of their game in shorter time spans and with less deliberate practise have emerged down through the years. Donald Thomas (Bahamian High Jump World Champ 2007) and Heather Glover (GB Gold Medallist from London & Rio Games) taking up rowing 48 months before her first Olympic title.   Despite all the debate, one thing is for sure – practise, commitment and hard work all are prerequisites of elite performance. No matter how much training and practise an athlete does if they don’t have innate ability/talent or of a particular phenotype for that sport will they ever truly be world class?

 

With the recent success of the O’Donovan brothers at the Olympic Games in Rio and Shane O’Driscoll and Mark O’Donovan at this years’ Europeans the future of Irish Rowing looks bright! In May, Rowing Ireland in association with the PESS Department / UL BEO began our search for the next crop of elite Irish junior rowers. Mark Lyons, James Mangan (Rowing Ireland), ULBEO and Seamus Hickey (sports science student) have been involved in implementing the talent identification programme. To date approximately 50 (13-17yrs old) potential rowers were put through their paces in a series of physiological tests at two of our Talent ID days at the University of Limerick Boathouse.

 

In a sport like rowing, high performance coaches are well aware that anthropometrics can have a big impact on performance. Moving the boat favours the use of long levers (arms and legs) to obtain maximum forward propulsion. This is why so many of the most successful rowers in the world are tall (Sydney Olympics – open class male rowers were on average 1.93cm tall and 93.6kg in weight, corresponding values for females were 1.81cm and 76.6kg). According to Norton and Olds (1996) secular trends have shown that the average height of males and females is increasing by 1.2 and 1.3cm per decade so it is quite possible that rowers competing in Tokyo 2020 will be biggest we’ve seen to date. Height, leg and arm dimensions are of particular interest to Rowing Ireland in their TID programme combined with strength and endurance profiles that lend their hand to the six-seven minute event (2k row). Longer limbs (arms & legs) allow for greater biomechanical efficiency of the rowing stroke where stroke length is increased and the application of force over a greater distance enhances performance. Research has shown that Finalists from World Junior Rowing Championships were significantly taller and had greater length dimensions (arm span, leg length) than non-finalists. However despite all these profiling measures there are always exceptions to the rules. World class athletes’ have emerged down through the years who don’t conform to the physical attributes of athletes associated with a particular sport – these are the real interesting cases!

 

 

How does the Talent ID programme work?

The main aim of our Talent ID programme is to identify youths with raw talent, anthropometric profiles, cardiovascular fitness combined with muscle strength and endurance conducive to high performance rowing. Once potential youths have been identified, if they are not already part of a club they will be introduced to their nearest rowing club and put on a monitoring programme where sports science support (strength and conditioning, technical coaching and nutrition) will be provided to help develop and support their talent. Youth who progress well on that system may have the potential to make the high performance national team.

 

What Testing is conducted on Talent ID Days?

Range of motion and functional movement tests – Ankle, leg, hip, back and shoulder mobility, FMS Screen

Anthropometrics – Height, Weight, Armspan

Rowing Proficiency/Kinematics using the Bio Row Catch Training System

Rowing Assessment – 500m ‘all out’ row on an ergometer

 

 

What type of youths are we looking for?

1.       Youths aged 13-17yrs

2.       Youths with good aerobic fitness and strength

3.       Tall youths with long levers (arms & legs)

4.       Committed, motivated individuals with a good work ethic

 

If you know of someone who may have the potential to be a successful rower please contact james.mangan@rowingireland.ie for more information about upcoming Talent ID days. Please note that rowing experience is not essential – youths from all sporting backgrounds are welcome.

In today’s world of high performance sport Talent Identification Programmes (TID) has become an integral part of high performance sport with countries like Australia and Great Britain adopting such strategies and experiencing great success. It is thought that such programmes which identify sporting talent, allow early recruitment and help fast track athletes into sports where they can excel. Despite some arguing TID models are associated with low predictive values of future success at senior level one cannot overlook the fact that 5 out of the 10 gold medallists for the GB rowing squad at the London 2012 Games were from TID sources.  The much touted theory of Ericsson’s 10,000 hour rule of deliberate practise to become an expert performer has also been challenged by Malcolm Galdwell book ‘Outliers: The story of success’ and David Epstein  book ‘The Sports Gene’. Many examples of athletes reaching the top of their game in shorter time spans and with less deliberate practise have emerged down through the years. Donald Thomas (Bahamian High Jump World Champ 2007) and Heather Glover (GB Gold Medallist from London & Rio Games) taking up rowing 48 months before her first Olympic title.   Despite all the debate, one thing is for sure – practise, commitment and hard work all are prerequisites of elite performance. No matter how much training and practise an athlete does if they don’t have innate ability/talent or of a particular phenotype for that sport will they ever truly be world class?

 

With the recent success of the O’Donovan brothers at the Olympic Games in Rio and Shane O’Driscoll and Mark O’Donovan at this years’ Europeans the future of Irish Rowing looks bright! In May, Rowing Ireland in association with the PESS Department / UL BEO began our search for the next crop of elite Irish junior rowers. Mark Lyons, James Mangan (Rowing Ireland), ULBEO and Seamus Hickey (sports science student) have been involved in implementing the talent identification programme. To date approximately 50 (13-17yrs old) potential rowers were put through their paces in a series of physiological tests at two of our Talent ID days at the University of Limerick Boathouse.

 

In a sport like rowing, high performance coaches are well aware that anthropometrics can have a big impact on performance. Moving the boat favours the use of long levers (arms and legs) to obtain maximum forward propulsion. This is why so many of the most successful rowers in the world are tall (Sydney Olympics – open class male rowers were on average 1.93cm tall and 93.6kg in weight, corresponding values for females were 1.81cm and 76.6kg). According to Norton and Olds (1996) secular trends have shown that the average height of males and females is increasing by 1.2 and 1.3cm per decade so it is quite possible that rowers competing in Tokyo 2020 will be biggest we’ve seen to date. Height, leg and arm dimensions are of particular interest to Rowing Ireland in their TID programme combined with strength and endurance profiles that lend their hand to the six-seven minute event (2k row). Longer limbs (arms & legs) allow for greater biomechanical efficiency of the rowing stroke where stroke length is increased and the application of force over a greater distance enhances performance. Research has shown that Finalists from World Junior Rowing Championships were significantly taller and had greater length dimensions (arm span, leg length) than non-finalists. However despite all these profiling measures there are always exceptions to the rules. World class athletes’ have emerged down through the years who don’t conform to the physical attributes of athletes associated with a particular sport – these are the real interesting cases!

 

 

How does the Talent ID programme work?

The main aim of our Talent ID programme is to identify youths with raw talent, anthropometric profiles, cardiovascular fitness combined with muscle strength and endurance conducive to high performance rowing. Once potential youths have been identified, if they are not already part of a club they will be introduced to their nearest rowing club and put on a monitoring programme where sports science support (strength and conditioning, technical coaching and nutrition) will be provided to help develop and support their talent. Youth who progress well on that system may have the potential to make the high performance national team.

 

What Testing is conducted on Talent ID Days?

Range of motion and functional movement tests – Ankle, leg, hip, back and shoulder mobility, FMS Screen

Anthropometrics – Height, Weight, Armspan

Rowing Proficiency/Kinematics using the Bio Row Catch Training System

Rowing Assessment – 500m ‘all out’ row on an ergometer

 

 

What type of youths are we looking for?

1.       Youths aged 13-17yrs

2.       Youths with good aerobic fitness and strength

3.       Tall youths with long levers (arms & legs)

4.       Committed, motivated individuals with a good work ethic

 

If you know of someone who may have the potential to be a successful rower please contact james.mangan@rowingireland.ie for more information about upcoming Talent ID days. Please note that rowing experience is not essential – youths from all sporting backgrounds are welcome.

In today’s world of high performance sport Talent Identification Programmes (TID) has become an integral part of high performance sport with countries like Australia and Great Britain adopting such strategies and experiencing great success. It is thought that such programmes which identify sporting talent, allow early recruitment and help fast track athletes into sports where they can excel. Despite some arguing TID models are associated with low predictive values of future success at senior level one cannot overlook the fact that 5 out of the 10 gold medallists for the GB rowing squad at the London 2012 Games were from TID sources.  The much touted theory of Ericsson’s 10,000 hour rule of deliberate practise to become an expert performer has also been challenged by Malcolm Galdwell book ‘Outliers: The story of success’ and David Epstein  book ‘The Sports Gene’. Many examples of athletes reaching the top of their game in shorter time spans and with less deliberate practise have emerged down through the years. Donald Thomas (Bahamian High Jump World Champ 2007) and Heather Glover (GB Gold Medallist from London & Rio Games) taking up rowing 48 months before her first Olympic title.   Despite all the debate, one thing is for sure – practise, commitment and hard work all are prerequisites of elite performance. No matter how much training and practise an athlete does if they don’t have innate ability/talent or of a particular phenotype for that sport will they ever truly be world class?

In today’s world of high performance sport Talent Identification Programmes (TID) has become an integral part of high performance sport with countries like Australia and Great Britain adopting such strategies and experiencing great success. It is thought that such programmes which identify sporting talent, allow early recruitment and help fast track athletes into sports where they can excel. Despite some arguing TID models are associated with low predictive values of future success at senior level one cannot overlook the fact that 5 out of the 10 gold medallists for the GB rowing squad at the London 2012 Games were from TID sources.  The much touted theory of Ericsson’s 10,000 hour rule of deliberate practise to become an expert performer has also been challenged by Malcolm Galdwell book ‘Outliers: The story of success’ and David Epstein  book ‘The Sports Gene’. Many examples of athletes reaching the top of their game in shorter time spans and with less deliberate practise have emerged down through the years. Donald Thomas (Bahamian High Jump World Champ 2007) and Heather Glover (GB Gold Medallist from London & Rio Games) taking up rowing 48 months before her first Olympic title.   Despite all the debate, one thing is for sure – practise, commitment and hard work all are prerequisites of elite performance. No matter how much training and practise an athlete does if they don’t have innate ability/talent or of a particular phenotype for that sport will they ever truly be world class?

In today’s world of high performance sport Talent Identification Programmes (TID) has become an integral part of high performance sport with countries like Australia and Great Britain adopting such strategies and experiencing great success. It is thought that such programmes which identify sporting talent, allow early recruitment and help fast track athletes into sports where they can excel. Despite some arguing TID models are associated with low predictive values of future success at senior level one cannot overlook the fact that 5 out of the 10 gold medallists for the GB rowing squad at the London 2012 Games were from TID sources.  The much touted theory of Ericsson’s 10,000 hour rule of deliberate practise to become an expert performer has also been challenged by Malcolm Galdwell book ‘Outliers: The story of success’ and David Epstein  book ‘The Sports Gene’. Many examples of athletes reaching the top of their game in shorter time spans and with less deliberate practise have emerged down through the years. Donald Thomas (Bahamian High Jump World Champ 2007) and Heather Glover (GB Gold Medallist from London & Rio Games) taking up rowing 48 months before her first Olympic title.   Despite all the debate, one thing is for sure – practise, commitment and hard work all are prerequisites of elite performance. No matter how much training and practise an athlete does if they don’t have innate ability/talent or of a particular phenotype for that sport will they ever truly be world class?

In today’s world of high performance sport Talent Identification Programmes (TID) has become an integral part of high performance sport with countries like Australia and Great Britain adopting such strategies and experiencing great success. It is thought that such programmes which identify sporting talent, allow early recruitment and help fast track athletes into sports where they can excel. Despite some arguing TID models are associated with low predictive values of future success at senior level one cannot overlook the fact that 5 out of the 10 gold medallists for the GB rowing squad at the London 2012 Games were from TID sources.  The much touted theory of Ericsson’s 10,000 hour rule of deliberate practise to become an expert performer has also been challenged by Malcolm Galdwell book ‘Outliers: The story of success’ and David Epstein  book ‘The Sports Gene’. Many examples of athletes reaching the top of their game in shorter time spans and with less deliberate practise have emerged down through the years. Donald Thomas (Bahamian High Jump World Champ 2007) and Heather Glover (GB Gold Medallist from London & Rio Games) taking up rowing 48 months before her first Olympic title.   Despite all the debate, one thing is for sure – practise, commitment and hard work all are prerequisites of elite performance. No matter how much training and practise an athlete does if they don’t have innate ability/talent or of a particular phenotype for that sport will they ever truly be world class?

wk13 rosie 2In today’s world of high performance sport Talent Identification Programmes (TID) has become an integral part of high performance sport with countries like Australia and Great Britain adopting such strategies and experiencing great success. It is thought that such programmes which identify sporting talent, allow early recruitment and help fast track athletes into sports where they can excel. Despite some arguing TID models are associated with low predictive values of future success at senior level one cannot overlook the fact that 5 out of the 10 gold medallists for the GB rowing squad at the London 2012 Games were from TID sources.  The much touted theory of Ericsson’s 10,000 hour rule of deliberate practise to become an expert performer has also been challenged by Malcolm Galdwell book ‘Outliers: The story of success’ and David Epstein  book ‘The Sports Gene’. Many examples of athletes reaching the top of their game in shorter time spans and with less deliberate practise have emerged down through the years. Donald Thomas (Bahamian High Jump World Champ 2007) and Heather Glover (GB Gold Medallist from London & Rio Games) taking up rowing 48 months before her first Olympic title.   Despite all the debate, one thing is for sure – practise, commitment and hard work all are prerequisites of elite performance. No matter how much training and practise an athlete does if they don’t have innate ability/talent or of a particular phenotype for that sport will they ever truly be world class?

wk13 rosie 3

With the recent success of the O’Donovan brothers at the Olympic Games in Rio and Shane O’Driscoll and Mark O’Donovan at this years’ Europeans the future of Irish Rowing looks bright! In May, Rowing Ireland in association with the PESS Department / UL BEO began our search for the next crop of elite Irish junior rowers. Mark Lyons, James Mangan (Rowing Ireland), ULBEO and Seamus Hickey (sports science student) have been involved in implementing the talent identification programme. To date approximately 50 (13-17yrs old) potential rowers were put through their paces in a series of physiological tests at two of our Talent ID days at the University of Limerick Boathouse.

In a sport like rowing, high performance coaches are well aware that anthropometrics can have a big impact on performance. Moving the boat favours the use of long levers (arms and legs) to obtain maximum forward propulsion. This is why so many of the most successful rowers in the world are tall (Sydney Olympics – open class male rowers were on average 1.93cm tall and 93.6kg in weight, corresponding values for females were 1.81cm and 76.6kg). According to Norton and Olds (1996) secular trends have shown that the average height of males and females is increasing by 1.2 and 1.3cm per decade so it is quite possible that rowers competing in Tokyo 2020 will be biggest we’ve seen to date. Height, leg and arm dimensions are of particular interest to Rowing Ireland in their TID programme combined with strength and endurance profiles that lend their hand to the six-seven minute event (2k row). Longer limbs (arms & legs) allow for greater biomechanical efficiency of the rowing stroke where stroke length is increased and the application of force over a greater distance enhances performance. Research has shown that Finalists from World Junior Rowing Championships were significantly taller and had greater length dimensions (arm span, leg length) than non-finalists. However despite all these profiling measures there are always exceptions to the rules. World class athletes’ have emerged down through the years who don’t conform to the physical attributes of athletes associated with a particular sport – these are the real interesting cases!

How does the Talent ID programme work?

The main aim of our Talent ID programme is to identify youths with raw talent, anthropometric profiles, cardiovascular fitness combined with muscle strength and endurance conducive to high performance rowing. Once potential youths have been identified, if they are not already part of a club they will be introduced to their nearest rowing club and put on a monitoring programme where sports science support (strength and conditioning, technical coaching and nutrition) will be provided to help develop and support their talent. Youth who progress well on that system may have the potential to make the high performance national team.

What Testing is conducted on Talent ID Days?

Range of motion and functional movement tests – Ankle, leg, hip, back and shoulder mobility, FMS Screen

Anthropometrics – Height, Weight, Armspan

Rowing Proficiency/Kinematics using the Bio Row Catch Training System

Rowing Assessment – 500m ‘all out’ row on an ergometer

What type of youths are we looking for?

  1. Youths aged 13-17yrs
  2. Youths with good aerobic fitness and strength
  3. Tall youths with long levers (arms & legs)
  4. Committed, motivated individuals with a good work ethic

If you know of someone who may have the potential to be a successful rower please contact james.mangan@rowingireland.ie for more information about upcoming Talent ID days. Please note that rowing experience is not essential – youths from all sporting backgrounds are welcome.

Rosemary Daniel is the UL Beo Applied Sport Experimental Officer here at the University of Limerick.

Rosie’s Email: Rosemary.Daniel@ul.ie

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